Is there any way to use MTS TV connected to a third-party router?

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  • Updated 5 months ago
I am trying to use a Google OnHub (the TP-Link one) and have MTS TV plugged directly into it. I am currently using a network switch that is plugged into the wall and then I plug the router into one port, and the TV box in another. I would like to eliminate the need for the switch as it bottlenecks my network (makes it almost unusable) with more than a few people using it. I would have no problem using the provided MTS router (it's actually a network extender), if it didn't stop working after a few days (needed to restart it all the time), and the range was sufficient enough to reach all the corners of my house. I'm afraid there is no solution to this problem, for the time being, and I am going to have to live with inconsistent Internet for a little while until I can get this figured out.

Any help would be appreciated! (Btw, I currently have 25mbps down/2mbps up Internet)
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Samuel Dion

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Posted 5 months ago

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CoryB, Champion

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I remember it is definitely possible but also 100% unsupported.
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Samuel Dion

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I’ve seen it done with other routers capable of running custom firmware, but the OnHub is pretty limited when it comes to customizability.
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Dustin, Champion

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The TV boxes need to be able to see the gateway in order to function. The only way a router can allow that is if it is configured to run as an access point rather than a router.  This results in the MTS gateway still doing all of the routing, but your router's ports/Wireless being used in place of the built in.  Connecting a router to another router is rarely a good thing, and usually results in issues. 

Your best bet is to keep the MTS TV units connected directly to the gateway.  Then, in the gateway settings, you configure a single port to provide a public IP address. You connect your wireless router to that port and use that for wireless/hardwired connections. This way, the internal routing is bypassed for your internet connection, and your router is free to perform its intended task. 
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I should add BellMTS has wireless tv (set top) boxes now if you need a tv in a location difficult to reach by wired connection.
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Jeremy, Official Rep

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Hi Samuel,
Looks like you got some pretty good answers in here already.  I would agree with Dustin on this one, your best bet is to connect your Bell MTS Set Top Box (STB) directly to the RG and run other devices through your router.  This will be the easiest solution if the configuration options in your router are limited.  If that is not an option however you theoretically could connect the RG to your router but you would have to disable DHCP and set that router in DMZ mode on the Bell MTS RG.  As Cory mentioned there is also the wireless STB's out now which would be an option.  I run one at home and it's great, very handy.

Best of luck to you, and if you do get it working please post your results.  I'm certain there are other community members that are curious and/or could benefit from your attempts.
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Samuel Dion

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I’m considering getting a wireless STB, but I am currently with Total Internet, which gives me 2 free wired STBs. What would the cost of adding a wireless emitter to my main STB and changing one of the those free wired STBs to a wireless one?
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Clifford Lewis, Champion

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Wireless STB's are $6 a month rental charge,  and looks like its a self install for the access point and box
https://www3.bellmts.ca/mts/support/tv/fibe+tv/installation+and+setup/set+up+your+wireless+set+top+b...
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Samuel Dion

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Took everyone’s ideas, and it works! I set my OnHub on bridge mode, to make it act as an access point and let the RG do the routing. I was now able to plug the STB’s Ethernet directly into my router and didn’t notice any issues. I’ll just have to test with a lot of people on the network today, and see if it fixes my bottlenecking issue. I’ll still use the switch attached to my router, because the OnHub only has 1 port, but at least the router is now directly tied to the RG.

As for other solutions mentioned, I wasn’t able to use those, at least for now. I only have 1 Ethernet port in my living room (where the OnHub and main STB is), so using a wireless STB could work if the main STB was relocated to another room in order to give it direct connection to the RG. The only other Ethernet in my house, is in the master bedroom, and that’s where the main STB could be located if I wanted to go wireless. My RG is located in the basement and all of it’s Ethernet ports are used to provide Ethernet to both my living room and the master bedroom, and the other port (I think there’s only 3 LAN ports) is used for the TV in the basement. I’d rather keep the OnHub in the living room to keep the best range in the whole house, but having wireless STB would be the best solution to solve all of this, and this could be achieved by relocating the main STB in the master bedroom.

Although it works now, I noticed an odd thing. When the TV in the living room is on, the internet speed drops by 10mbps, and as soon as it’s turned off it goes back to normal. That’s why I would like to get a wireless STB here, to prevent this, but it doesn’t affect usuability too much in my testing. I had seen this mentioned in another post at some point, but don’t know if there was a solution or not.

Thanks to everyone who helped out!
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Dustin, Champion

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The internet speed dropping with the TV on is likely normal, as the bandwidth into the home is shared between the 2 services. A 100 MBPS ethernet connection will have ample bandwidth to supply a single TV box while saturating a 25mbps ISP service.
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Jeremy, Official Rep

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Dustin is correct, the connection is shared among the 2 services, TV and Internet.  Granted a 10 Mbps drop does seem a little higher than normal, some loss of speed is to be expected. How much you loose depends on what you are doing, HD takes more bandwidth than SD of course, and I believe streaming (Netflix or Crave) takes even more than that.
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CoryB, Champion

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The amount of the speed drop is from xed however if your internet use is close to the maximum available on the line the impact of that drop will be much more noticeable.